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Mongolia

The ITUC affiliate in Mongolia is the Confederation of Mongolian Trade Unions (CMTU).

In practice

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Workers picket over violence and nepotism 12-10-2020

The workers, affiliated to the Federation of Energy, Geology and Mining Workers’ Trade Unions of Mongolia (MEGM), called on the government to act against a company head who assaulted MEGM’s company level union leader when she called out the company’s practices of nepotism.
The first-ever picket in Mongolia’s energy sector gathered more than 20 workers at the state-owned Thermal Power Plant 2 SSH Co. (TPP2) on 12 October, with protestors raising their voices over violence against women union leaders and over rampant nepotism in the company.
The local branch of MEGM has campaigned against nepotism since June, demanding that the company stop hiring relatives of top management. These well-connected workers enjoy higher wages and benefits than other staff with higher positions.

Trafficking, forced labour and migrant workers30-09-2011

Despite legislation against trafficking and forced labour, Mongolia remains a source country for trafficking, primarily of women, mostly to China and Asian countries. Local NGOs have also reported an increase in internal sex trafficking and forced prostitution.

Draft legislation on combating trafficking in persons was debated in 2011. The aim of the proposed stand-alone law is to prevent trafficking and protect victims through improved rehabilitation and reintegration assistance and compensation. The draft law was approved by MPs on 28 October. Around 200,000 Chinese are estimated to be working in Mongolia. A decision to employ 6,949 workers from China in the Oyu Toloi mine in May prompted calls for a labour inspection labour inspection An authority responsible for ensuring compliance with labour laws and legal provisions relating to protection of workers through the inspection of workplaces. by the Mongolian Labour Union.

Trafficking, forced labour, and migrant workers31-12-2010

Despite legislation against trafficking and forced labour, Mongolia remains a source country for trafficking, primarily of women, mostly to China and other Asian countries. Local NGOs have also reported an increase in internal sex trafficking and forced prostitution. The authorities have done little to prevent and prosecute offenders.

Mongolian law specifically prohibits forced labour but reports continue to emerge regarding the situation of some 250 North Korean workers mainly employed in mining, factory work, utilities, transportation, construction, customer service, and health service. It is believed that they are prohibited from leaving work and are unable to complain about working conditions.

There are 200,000 Chinese workers estimated to be working in Mongolia. In September, twenty Chinese workers, previously reported missing, were uncovered to have been staying without work visas and were to be repatriated. According to local media a total of 84 migrant workers from Huarong went to Mongolia through a Chinese labour agency. The first group of them, holding tourist visas, left China in mid August, and on arrival in Mongolia their passports were taken away. According to some of the workers, they were then effectively ‘bought’ by Mongolian employers for around RMB 4,000 RMB (around EUR 450) and worked as slaves. One report stated that several tens of thousands of Chinese migrant workers were being brought into Mongolia to work in the construction and mining sectors under similar circumstances.

Child labour31-12-2010

Child labour remains a problem and sources suggest that some 77,000 children are forced to work to support themselves or their families. Up to 90% of these are believed to be involved in traditional animal husbandry. Many children are also involved in informal mining operations, and the average age of child miners is just 14 years. Over 30,000 children work as jockeys each year.

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